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Again Pronunciation

Again Pronunciation in American and British English: American English (US) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈɡɛn/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GEN Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, which is a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa").  /ˈɡɛn/: The second syllable is stressed, with "e" pronounced like the "e" in "men," followed by an "n" sound. British English (UK) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈɡeɪn/ or /əˈɡɛn/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GAYN or uh-GEN Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, the same as in American English. /ˈɡeɪn/: One common pronunciation has the second syllable stressed, with "ai" pronounced like the "ay" in "say," followed by an "n" sound.  /ˈɡɛn/: Another common pronunciation is similar to the American version, with "e" pronounced like the "e" in "men," followed by an &qu

Afternoon Pronunciation

Afternoon Pronunciation in American and British English: American English (US) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /ˌæf.tɚˈnun/ Phonetic Spelling: af-ter-NOON Breakdown: /ˌæf/: The first syllable is unstressed, with "a" pronounced like the "a" in "cat," followed by an "f" sound. /tɚ/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "er" pronounced with a schwa-like sound (similar to the "er" in "water" in American English). /ˈnun/: The third syllable is stressed, with "oo" pronounced like the "oo" in "moon," followed by an "n" sound. British English (UK) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /ˌɑːf.təˈnuːn/ Phonetic Spelling: ahf-tuh-NOON Breakdown: /ˌɑːf/: The first syllable is unstressed, with "a" pronounced like the "a" in "father," followed by an "f" sound. /tə/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "er" pronounced with a schwa sound, softer and

After Pronunciation

After Pronunciation in American and British English: American English (US) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /ˈæf.tɚ/ Phonetic Spelling: AF-ter Breakdown: /ˈæf/: The first syllable is stressed, with "a" pronounced like the "a" in "cat," followed by an "f" sound. /tɚ/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "er" pronounced with a schwa-like sound (similar to the "er" in "water" in American English). British English (UK) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /ˈɑːf.tə/ Phonetic Spelling: AHF-tuh Breakdown: /ˈɑːf/: The first syllable is stressed, with "a" pronounced like the "a" in "father," followed by an "f" sound. /tə/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "er" pronounced with a schwa sound, softer and without the r-colored vowel sound found in American English. In both American and British English, the pronunciation of "after" differs slightly in the vowel sounds and

Afraid Pronunciation

Afraid Pronunciation in American and British English: American English (US) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈfreɪd/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-FRAYD Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, which is a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa"). /ˈfreɪd/: The second syllable is stressed, with "ai" pronounced like the "a" in "say," followed by a "d" sound. British English (UK) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈfreɪd/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-FRAYD Breakdown:  /ə/: The first syllable is the same as in American English, pronounced with a schwa sound. /ˈfreɪd/: The second syllable is stressed, and the pronunciation is quite similar to the American version, with "ai" pronounced like the "a" in "say," followed by a "d" sound. In both American and British English, the pronunciation of "afraid" is very similar, with slight regional variations in accent but

Afford Pronunciation

US Pronunciation: In American English, the word "afford" is typically pronounced as /əˈfɔrd/ (uh-FOHRD). The stress falls on the second syllable (FOHRD). UK Pronunciation: In British English, the word "afford" is usually pronounced as /əˈfɔːrd/ (ə-FORRD). The stress also falls on the second syllable, but with a more open and diphthongized vowel sound (ə- as in "here" or "there", and ORRD with a longer "o" sound). So, while both pronunciations are correct, the main difference is in the vowel quality and duration of the second syllable.

Affair Pronunciation

In the US, "affair" is typically pronounced as /əˈfer/, with emphasis on the second syllable. In the UK, it is usually pronounced as /əˈfeə/, also with emphasis on the second syllable, but with a slightly different vowel sound in the second syllable.

Aesthetic Pronunciation

The pronunciation of "Aesthetic" differs slightly between US and UK English: US Pronunciation: /ɛsˈθɛtɪk/ (es-THET-ik) - "Aesth-" is pronounced like "est" in "best" - "-etic" is pronounced like "etic" in "prohetic" UK Pronunciation: /iːsˈθɛtɪk/ (ee-STHET-ik) - "Aesth-" is pronounced like "east" in "yeast" - "-etic" is pronounced like "etic" in "prohetic" In both US and UK English, the stress is on the second syllable (es-THET-ik and ee-STHET-ik respectively). The main difference is in the first syllable, where US English uses a short "e" sound (es-), while UK English uses a long "ee" sound (ee-).