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Showing posts with the label word-starting-with-a

How to pronounce Air in American English and British English

Learn the pronunciation of 'air' in both American and British English. Discover the IPA notation and phonetic spelling, along with a detailed breakdown of each syllable. Air Pronunciation in American English: IPA Notation: /er/ Phonetic Spelling: air Breakdown: - /er/: The only syllable is pronounced with a vowel sound similar to the "a" in "care" followed by an "r" sound. Air Pronunciation in British English: IPA Notation: /eə(r)/ Phonetic Spelling: air Breakdown: - /eə/: The first and only syllable is pronounced with a diphthong sound, starting with the "e" in "bed" and gliding to a schwa sound (a neutral vowel). - /r/: The "r" sound at the end is often silent in non-rhotic accents. In both American and British English, the pronunciation of "air" is similar, with the main difference being the treatment of the "r" sound, which is more pronounced in American English and often silent in British Engli

How to pronounce Aim in American English and British English

Learn the pronunciation of 'aim' in both American and British English. Discover the IPA notation and phonetic spelling, along with a detailed breakdown of each syllable. Aim Pronunciation in American English: IPA Notation: /eɪm/ Phonetic Spelling: ay-m Breakdown: - /eɪ/: The first and only syllable is pronounced with a diphthong sound, where the vowel sound glides from the "a" in "face" to the "i" in "fine." - /m/: The syllable ends with the "m" sound, as in "man." Aim Pronunciation in British English: IPA Notation: /eɪm/ Phonetic Spelling: ay-m Breakdown: - /eɪ/: The pronunciation of the diphthong in the first and only syllable is the same as in American English, starting with the "a" in "face" and gliding to the "i" in "fine." - /m/: The syllable ends with the "m" sound, similar to the American pronunciation. In both American and British English, the pronunciation of

How to pronounce Ahead in American English and British English

Learn the pronunciation of 'ahead' in both American and British English. Discover the IPA notation and phonetic spelling, along with a detailed breakdown of each syllable. Ahead Pronunciation in American English: IPA Notation: /əˈhed/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-HED Breakdown: - /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, which is a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa"). - /ˈhed/: The second syllable is stressed, with "e" pronounced like the "e" in "bed," followed by a "d" sound. Ahead Pronunciation in British English: IPA Notation: /əˈhed/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-HED Breakdown: - /ə/: The first syllable is the same as in American English, pronounced with a schwa sound. - /ˈhed/: The second syllable is stressed, and the pronunciation is quite similar to the American version, with "e" pronounced like the "e" in "bed," followed by a "d" sound. In both Ameri

Agriculture Pronunciation

American and British English Pronunciation of Agriculture. Agriculture Pronunciation in American English: IPA Notation: /ˈæɡ.rəˌkʌl.tʃɚ/ Phonetic Spelling: AG-ruh-kul-chur Breakdown: /ˈæɡ/: The first syllable is stressed, with "a" pronounced like the "a" in "cat," followed by a "g" sound. /rə/: The second syllable is unstressed, with a schwa sound, which is a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa"). /ˌkʌl/: The third syllable is stressed, with "u" pronounced like the "u" in "cup," followed by an "l" sound. /tʃɚ/: The fourth syllable is unstressed, with "ch" pronounced like the "ch" in "chair," followed by a schwa-like "r" sound. Agriculture Pronunciation in British English: IPA Notation: /ˈæɡ.rɪˌkʌl.tʃə/ Phonetic Spelling: AG-rih-kul-chuh Breakdown: /ˈæɡ/: The first syllable is stressed, with "a" pronounced like the "

Agree Pronunciation

American and British English Pronunciation of Agree. Agree Pronunciation in American English: IPA Notation: /əˈɡriː/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GREE Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, which is a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa"). /ˈɡriː/: The second syllable is stressed, with "gree" pronounced like the "gree" in "agree," with a long "ee" sound at the end. Agree Pronunciation in British English: IPA Notation: /əˈɡriː/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GREE Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, the same as in American English. /ˈɡriː/: The second syllable is stressed, with "gree" pronounced like the "gree" in "agree," with a long "ee" sound at the end. In both American and British English, the pronunciation of "agree" is identical, with the same schwa sound in the first syllable and the same long "ee"

Ago Pronunciation

American and British English Pronunciation of Ago. Ago Pronunciation in American English: IPA Notation: /əˈɡoʊ/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GOH Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, which is a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa").  /ˈɡoʊ/: The second syllable is stressed, with "o" pronounced like the "o" in "go," followed by a "w" sound at the end. Ago Pronunciation in British English: IPA Notation: /əˈɡəʊ/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GOH Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, the same as in American English. /ˈɡəʊ/: The second syllable is stressed, with "o" pronounced like the "o" in "go," followed by a "w" sound at the end. In both American and British English, the pronunciation of "ago" is very similar, with the same schwa sound in the first syllable and slight variations in the diphthong of the second syll

Agent Pronunciation

American and British English Pronunciation of Agent. Agent Pronunciation in American English: IPA Notation: /ˈeɪ.dʒənt/ Phonetic Spelling: AY-jənt Breakdown: /ˈeɪ/: The first syllable is stressed and pronounced with a diphthong, starting with a sound like the "a" in "say" and gliding into an "ee" sound. /dʒənt/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "j" like the "g" in "giant" and a schwa sound for the "e," pronounced as a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa"), followed by an "n" and a soft "t" sound. Agent Pronunciation in British English: IPA Notation: /ˈeɪ.dʒənt/ Phonetic Spelling: AY-jənt Breakdown: /ˈeɪ/: The first syllable is stressed and pronounced with a diphthong, starting with a sound like the "a" in "say" and gliding into an "ee" sound. /dʒənt/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "j" like the "g&q

Agency Pronunciation

American and British English Pronunciation of Agency. Agency Pronunciation in American English: IPA Notation: /ˈeɪ.dʒən.si/ Phonetic Spelling: AY-jən-see Breakdown: /ˈeɪ/: The first syllable is stressed and pronounced with a diphthong, starting with a sound like the "a" in "say" and gliding into an "ee" sound. /dʒən/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "j" like the "g" in "giant" and a schwa sound for the "e," pronounced as a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa"), followed by an "n" sound. /si/: The third syllable is unstressed, with "i" pronounced like the "ee" in "see." Agency Pronunciation in British English: IPA Notation: /ˈeɪ.dʒən.si/ Phonetic Spelling: AY-jən-see Breakdown: /ˈeɪ/: The first syllable is stressed and pronounced with a diphthong, starting with a sound like the "a" in "say" and gliding into an &q

Age Pronunciation

American and British English Pronunciation of Age. Age Pronunciation in American English: IPA Notation: /eɪdʒ/ Phonetic Spelling: AYJ Breakdown: /eɪ/: The single syllable is pronounced with a diphthong, starting with a sound like the "a" in "say" and gliding into an "ee" sound. /dʒ/: The ending is a voiced "j" sound, like the "g" in "giant." Age Pronunciation in British English: IPA Notation: /eɪdʒ/ Phonetic Spelling: AYJ Breakdown: /eɪ/: The single syllable is pronounced with a diphthong, starting with a sound like the "a" in "say" and gliding into an "ee" sound. /dʒ/: The ending is a voiced "j" sound, like the "g" in "giant." In both American and British English, the pronunciation of "age" is virtually identical, with the same diphthong and ending sound.

Against Pronunciation

Against Pronunciation in American and British English: American English (US) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈɡɛnst/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GENST Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, which is a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa").  /ˈɡɛnst/: The second syllable is stressed, with "e" pronounced like the "e" in "men," followed by "nst," where the "n" and "st" are pronounced together as in "inst." British English (UK) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈɡeɪnst/ or /əˈɡɛnst/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GAYNST or uh-GENST Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, the same as in American English. /ˈɡeɪnst/: One common pronunciation has the second syllable stressed, with "ai" pronounced like the "ay" in "say," followed by "nst," where the "n" and "st" are pronounced together as

Again Pronunciation

Again Pronunciation in American and British English: American English (US) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈɡɛn/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GEN Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, which is a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa").  /ˈɡɛn/: The second syllable is stressed, with "e" pronounced like the "e" in "men," followed by an "n" sound. British English (UK) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈɡeɪn/ or /əˈɡɛn/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-GAYN or uh-GEN Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, the same as in American English. /ˈɡeɪn/: One common pronunciation has the second syllable stressed, with "ai" pronounced like the "ay" in "say," followed by an "n" sound.  /ˈɡɛn/: Another common pronunciation is similar to the American version, with "e" pronounced like the "e" in "men," followed by an &qu

Afternoon Pronunciation

Afternoon Pronunciation in American and British English: American English (US) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /ˌæf.tɚˈnun/ Phonetic Spelling: af-ter-NOON Breakdown: /ˌæf/: The first syllable is unstressed, with "a" pronounced like the "a" in "cat," followed by an "f" sound. /tɚ/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "er" pronounced with a schwa-like sound (similar to the "er" in "water" in American English). /ˈnun/: The third syllable is stressed, with "oo" pronounced like the "oo" in "moon," followed by an "n" sound. British English (UK) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /ˌɑːf.təˈnuːn/ Phonetic Spelling: ahf-tuh-NOON Breakdown: /ˌɑːf/: The first syllable is unstressed, with "a" pronounced like the "a" in "father," followed by an "f" sound. /tə/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "er" pronounced with a schwa sound, softer and

After Pronunciation

After Pronunciation in American and British English: American English (US) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /ˈæf.tɚ/ Phonetic Spelling: AF-ter Breakdown: /ˈæf/: The first syllable is stressed, with "a" pronounced like the "a" in "cat," followed by an "f" sound. /tɚ/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "er" pronounced with a schwa-like sound (similar to the "er" in "water" in American English). British English (UK) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /ˈɑːf.tə/ Phonetic Spelling: AHF-tuh Breakdown: /ˈɑːf/: The first syllable is stressed, with "a" pronounced like the "a" in "father," followed by an "f" sound. /tə/: The second syllable is unstressed, with "er" pronounced with a schwa sound, softer and without the r-colored vowel sound found in American English. In both American and British English, the pronunciation of "after" differs slightly in the vowel sounds and

Afraid Pronunciation

Afraid Pronunciation in American and British English: American English (US) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈfreɪd/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-FRAYD Breakdown: /ə/: The first syllable is pronounced with a schwa sound, which is a neutral, unstressed vowel sound (like the "a" in "sofa"). /ˈfreɪd/: The second syllable is stressed, with "ai" pronounced like the "a" in "say," followed by a "d" sound. British English (UK) Pronunciation: IPA Notation: /əˈfreɪd/ Phonetic Spelling: uh-FRAYD Breakdown:  /ə/: The first syllable is the same as in American English, pronounced with a schwa sound. /ˈfreɪd/: The second syllable is stressed, and the pronunciation is quite similar to the American version, with "ai" pronounced like the "a" in "say," followed by a "d" sound. In both American and British English, the pronunciation of "afraid" is very similar, with slight regional variations in accent but

Afford Pronunciation

US Pronunciation: In American English, the word "afford" is typically pronounced as /əˈfɔrd/ (uh-FOHRD). The stress falls on the second syllable (FOHRD). UK Pronunciation: In British English, the word "afford" is usually pronounced as /əˈfɔːrd/ (ə-FORRD). The stress also falls on the second syllable, but with a more open and diphthongized vowel sound (ə- as in "here" or "there", and ORRD with a longer "o" sound). So, while both pronunciations are correct, the main difference is in the vowel quality and duration of the second syllable.

Affair Pronunciation

In the US, "affair" is typically pronounced as /əˈfer/, with emphasis on the second syllable. In the UK, it is usually pronounced as /əˈfeə/, also with emphasis on the second syllable, but with a slightly different vowel sound in the second syllable.

Aesthetic Pronunciation

The pronunciation of "Aesthetic" differs slightly between US and UK English: US Pronunciation: /ɛsˈθɛtɪk/ (es-THET-ik) - "Aesth-" is pronounced like "est" in "best" - "-etic" is pronounced like "etic" in "prohetic" UK Pronunciation: /iːsˈθɛtɪk/ (ee-STHET-ik) - "Aesth-" is pronounced like "east" in "yeast" - "-etic" is pronounced like "etic" in "prohetic" In both US and UK English, the stress is on the second syllable (es-THET-ik and ee-STHET-ik respectively). The main difference is in the first syllable, where US English uses a short "e" sound (es-), while UK English uses a long "ee" sound (ee-).

Aeroplane Pronunciation

The pronunciation of "Aeroplane" differs between US and UK English: US Pronunciation: /ˌɛrəˈpleɪn/ (ER-uh-PLAYN) - "Aero" is pronounced like "ero" in "hero" - "plane" is pronounced like the word "plane" UK Pronunciation: /ˈɛərəʊˌpleɪn/ (AIR-uh-PLAYN) - "Aero" is pronounced like "air-oh" - "plane" is pronounced like the word "plane" In US English, the stress is on the second syllable (ER-uh-PLAYN), while in UK English, the stress is on the first syllable (AIR-uh-PLAYN). In US English, the word "Aeroplane" is not commonly used, and "Airplane" is preferred instead. The pronunciation of "Airplane" in US English is /ˈɛrəˌpleɪn/ (ER-uh-PLAYN).

Advice Pronunciation

The pronunciation of "Advice" differs slightly between US and UK English: US Pronunciation: /ədˈvaɪs/ (əd-VYSE) - "əd" is pronounced like the "ud" in "bud" - "vaɪs" is pronounced like the "vice" in "vice" UK Pronunciation: /ədˈvaɪs/ (əd-VYSE) - "əd" is pronounced like the "ud" in "bud" - "vaɪs" is pronounced like the "vice" in "vice", with a slightly longer "i" sound Both pronunciations are widely accepted, and the difference is mainly in the vowel sound of the second syllable. In US English, the "i" is pronounced more like "y", while in UK English, it's pronounced more like "ee". Note that the stress pattern is the same in both US and UK English: AD-vice, with the stress on the first syllable.

Advertisement Pronunciation

The pronunciation of Advertisement differs slightly between US and UK English: US Pronunciation: /ˌædvərtaɪzˈmɛnt/ (AD-vur-tyz-MENT) - "Ad" is pronounced like the "ad" in "sad" - "ver" is pronounced like the "ver" in "ver" - "tise" is pronounced like the "tise" in "ise" (like "ise" in "prise") - "ment" is pronounced like the "ment" in "ment" Here's a breakdown of how to pronounce each syllable: - AD- (like the "ad" in "sad", with a short "a" sound) - vur- (like the "ver" in "ver", with a short "u" sound) - tyz- (like the "tise" in "ise", with a short "i" sound) - MENT (like the "ment" in "ment", with a short "e" sound) UK Pronunciation: /ˌædvɜːtaɪzˈmɛnt/ (AD-vur-TYZ-MENT) - "Ad" is pronounced like the "ad"